Dr Robert Newbery

Senior Lecturer in Enterprise and Innovation

Dr Robert Newbery is a Senior Lecturer in Enterprise and Innovation in Newcastle University Business School and leads the Entrepreneurship Research Group as part of the University’s KITE institute. With a background as an engineer and rural entrepreneur, he has experience in evaluating and supporting initiatives ranging from the world’s largest business plan competition (YouWin! Nigeria) for DfID to the award winning ICURE programme for the SETSquared partnership.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Biography

Dr Robert Newbery is a Senior Lecturer in Enterprise and Innovation in Newcastle University Business School and leads the Entrepreneurship Research Group as part of the University’s KITE institute. With a background as an engineer and rural entrepreneur, he has experience in evaluating and supporting initiatives ranging from the world’s largest business plan competition (YouWin! Nigeria) for DfID to the award winning ICURE programme for the SETSquared partnership. His PhD explored the role and impact of local business associations on rural service centres. He is currently leading an innovative rural supply chain micro-franchise scale-up project in Kenya for Comic Relief. His current research relates to entrepreneurship and farmers in the developing and developed context; evaluating and measuring the impact of entrepreneurship initiatives; and critical approaches to entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Research Paper

Rural business aspirations, obstacles and support: an analysis of the Longitudinal Small Business Survey 2015 Research Paper No. 58

A rural-urban analysis of the UK’s Governments Longitudinal Small Business Survey (LSBS) responses for 2015 has been undertaken to understand spatial variations in performance and uptake of external support services. The analysis is based on 15,500 survey responses from across the UK and uses official rural-urban classifications. Approximately 28 per cent of survey responses to the LSBS are classified as rural. Within the rural context, conclusions relating to growth have previously been hampered by difficulties in separating out whether rural location has a distinctive effect or whether spatial variations in business performance reflects differences in size, sector and age of business. Therefore this analysis used Propensity Score Matching (PSM) to control for these and other profile variables, allowing for an assessment of rural effects on business performance.

Associated Themes