Professor Matthew Gorton

Joint head of the Marketing, Operations and Systems subject group

Professor Matthew Gorton is joint head of the Marketing, Operations and Systems subject group at Newcastle University and has 20 years of experience in rural development research, acting as a principal investigator on 4 EU projects (COMPETE, FOCUS BALKANS, SCARLED, INNOGROW). He is co-coordinator of Rural Enterprise UK and currently leads the Pan-European project Strength2Food, looking at short supply chains. He is a trained economist and his PhD considered the growth and performance of rural SMEs. He has undertaken research for DG AGRI, World Bank, FAO and OECD. He recently undertook work with Frontier Economics, for the UK Government, on rural business performance and growth.

Contact Details

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Biography

Professor Matthew Gorton is joint head of the Marketing, Operations and Systems subject group at Newcastle University and has 20 years of experience in rural development research, acting as a principal investigator on 4 EU projects (COMPETE, FOCUS BALKANS, SCARLED, INNOGROW). He is co-coordinator of Rural Enterprise UK and currently leads the Pan-European project Strength2Food, looking at short supply chains. He is a trained economist and his PhD considered the growth and performance of rural SMEs. He has undertaken research for DG AGRI, World Bank, FAO and OECD. He recently undertook work with Frontier Economics, for the UK Government, on rural business performance and growth.

 

Research Paper

Rural business aspirations, obstacles and support: an analysis of the Longitudinal Small Business Survey 2015 Research Paper No. 58

A rural-urban analysis of the UK’s Governments Longitudinal Small Business Survey (LSBS) responses for 2015 has been undertaken to understand spatial variations in performance and uptake of external support services. The analysis is based on 15,500 survey responses from across the UK and uses official rural-urban classifications. Approximately 28 per cent of survey responses to the LSBS are classified as rural. Within the rural context, conclusions relating to growth have previously been hampered by difficulties in separating out whether rural location has a distinctive effect or whether spatial variations in business performance reflects differences in size, sector and age of business. Therefore this analysis used Propensity Score Matching (PSM) to control for these and other profile variables, allowing for an assessment of rural effects on business performance.

Associated Themes