Andrew Johnston

Principal Lecturer in International Business and Economics

Andrew is a Principal Lecturer in International Business and Economics at Sheffield Hallam University and is director of the International Business and Economics Research Group (IBERG). His research interests focus on the broad areas of innovation, entrepreneurship and regional economic development, specifically collaborative ties between firms and universities and entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Contact Details

Biography

Andrew is a Principal Lecturer in International Business and Economics at Sheffield Hallam University and is director of the International Business and Economics Research Group (IBERG). His research interests focus on the broad areas of innovation, entrepreneurship and regional economic development, specifically collaborative ties between firms and universities and entrepreneurial ecosystems.

SOTA Review

Collaboration and Knowledge Transfer between SMEs and Universities. SOTA review No 42

Collaborative links between firms and universities are regarded as an important mechanism for the pursuit of R&D activities within an economy and encouraging innovation among firms. Due to their relative resource constraints, SMEs potentially stand to benefit from these collaborations as a means for leveraging new knowledge and expertise into the firm. This review examines the factors that underpin these collaborations, revealing it to be a socio-technical process reliant upon the ability of those involved to interact and understand one another. Thus, cognitive and relational similarities, i.e. sharing characteristics in terms of mutual networks and a common technical language, facilitate the formation and function of these collaborations.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
  • Productivity and performance
SOTA Review

University-Industry Collaboration: Are SMEs Different? SOTA review No 41

There is significant interest in university-industry collaboration among both academics and policymakers. These collaborative links are regarded as an important mechanism for the pursuit of R&D activities within an economy and encouraging innovation among firms. Due to their relative resource constraints, SMEs potentially stand to benefit from these collaborations as a means for leveraging new knowledge and expertise into the firm. However, perceptions of non-engagement with universities among SMEs are commonplace within the academic literature. In order to investigate this in more detail, this review examines the impact of firm size on university-industry collaborations to assess whether SMEs are in fact distinct. The findings suggest that while SMEs do collaborate with universities, they are subject to differing dynamics as firm size has a significant impact on type of collaboration, the outcomes, perception of barriers, and reliance on local universities.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
Policy Briefing

University Engagement and Productivity in Innovative SMEs: An Empirical Assessment.

Current debates around the nature of the innovation process increasingly stress its open character, whereby firms utilise knowledge and expertise from outside organisations. From the perspective of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), open innovation allows the leveraging of additional resources which they would not necessarily be able to develop alone. In the context of open innovation universities are often cited as important sources of external knowledge and key nodes within innovation systems due to their ability to generate and transfer new, cutting edge, knowledge.

Associated Themes
  • Productivity and performance
Research Paper

University Engagement and Productivity in Innovative SMEs: An Empirical Assessment. Research Paper No 78

Current debates around the nature of the innovation process increasingly stress its open character, whereby firms utilise knowledge and expertise from outside organisations. From the perspective of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), open innovation allows the leveraging of additional resources which they would not necessarily be able to develop alone. In the context of open innovation universities are often cited as important sources of external knowledge and key nodes within innovation systems due to their ability to generate and transfer new, cutting edge, knowledge.

Associated Themes
  • Productivity and performance
Research Paper

Assessing the characteristics, determinants and spatial variations of internationalised new ventures in the UK. Research Paper No 56

This study focuses on internationalised new ventures, here defined as firms that have been trading for 5 years or fewer and which have already engaged in selling their goods and/or services abroad. The report presents analysis of data from the Longitudinal Small Business Survey that: 1) examines differences between internationalised and non-internationalised new ventures, 2) assesses the factors which determine whether a new firm is likely to engage in export activity early in its lifetime; and 3) maps the geographic distribution of these internationalised new ventures across the UK.

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
Policy Briefing

Assessing the characteristics, determinants and spatial variations of internationalised new ventures in the UK.

This study focuses on internationalised new ventures, here defined as firms that have been trading for 5 years or fewer and which have already engaged in selling their goods and/or services abroad. The report presents analysis of data from the Longitudinal Small Business Survey that: 1) examines differences between internationalised and non-internationalised new ventures, 2) assesses the factors which determine whether a new firm is likely to engage in export activity early in its lifetime; and 3) maps the geographic distribution of these internationalised new ventures across the UK.

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth