Nicos Nicolaou

Professor - Warwick Business School

Nicos Nicolaou is a Professor at Warwick Business School with research interest in Entrepreneurship, Genetics of Entrepreneurship, Biology of Entrepreneurship, Middle Market Firms, Social Networks, Behavioral Genetics, University Spinouts and Innovation.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Biography

Nicos Nicolaou is a Professor at Warwick Business School with research interest in Entrepreneurship, Genetics of Entrepreneurship, Biology of Entrepreneurship, Middle Market Firms, Social Networks, Behavioral Genetics, University Spinouts and Innovation.

He previously held faculty and/or visiting positions at Imperial College London, University of Cambridge, Cass Business School and the University of Cyprus. His research has been mentioned on the CNN, BBC, The Times, USA Today, ABC News, Reuters, MSNBC, Washington Post, The New York Times, The Independent, Daily Telegraph etc.

He has published in journals like Management Science, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Business Venturing, Human Resource Management (US), Research Policy, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, and others. He has received both research and teaching awards including the 2013 INFORMS Technology Management Best Paper Award for the best paper published in an entire year in Management Science or Organization Science, two of the leading journals in the field, the Principal’s Award for the best teaching scores at Imperial College London, and the Psion Prize for the best doctoral thesis.

SOTA Review

The Biology of Entrepreneurship. SOTA Review No 27

What makes an entrepreneur? The past few years have witnessed a significant increase in research examining the role of biology in entrepreneurship. For instance, evidence shows that the genetic factors explain almost half of the variance in people’s tendencies towards entrepreneurship (Nicolaou, Shane, Cherkas & Spector, 2008). Other research suggests that hormones, such as testosterone and cortisol, affect the propensity of people to become entrepreneurs (Nicolaou, Patel & Wolfe, 2018; Wolfe & Patel, 2017b). Further research argues that entrepreneurs have increased activations in the frontopolar cortex of the brain when engaging in exploration tasks (Laureiro-Martinez et al., 2014). Studies also show that mental conditions, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (Wiklund, Yu, Tucker & Marino, 2017), dyslexia (Logan, 2009), depression (Hessels, Rietveld, Thurik & van der Zwan, 2018), bipolar disorder (Johnson, Madole & Freeman, 2018) and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (Wolfe & Patel, 2017a), influence the propensity of individuals to engage in entrepreneurial outcomes.

Associated Themes
  • Entrepreneurship
Research Paper

The relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and internationalization intentions. Research Paper No 54

This article examines the relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and their exporting intentions. We hypothesise that this relationship is positive but moderated by a firm’s age. We test our hypotheses using a novel dataset of middle market firms across four large EU economies. Our analysis demonstrates that the relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and their exporting intentions is different for younger and older firms. When younger firms have ready access to finance they are less likely to enter new geographic markets, while when older firms have ready access to finance they are actually more likely to enter new geographic markets.

Associated Themes
  • Finance
Policy Briefing

The relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and internationalization intentions.

This article examines the relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and their exporting intentions. We hypothesise that this relationship is positive but moderated by a firm’s age. We test our hypotheses using a novel dataset of middle market firms across four large EU economies. Our analysis demonstrates that the relationship between middle market firms’ access to finance and their exporting intentions is different for younger and older firms. When younger firms have ready access to finance they are less likely to enter new geographic markets, while when older firms have ready access to finance they are actually more likely to enter new geographic markets.

Associated Themes
  • Finance
Insight

Sustaining growth – the HR dimension HR practices and management and leadership skills of High Growth SMEs

This research set out to investigate human resource management (HRM) practices and leadership behaviours in UK SMEs that represent a small proportion of firms to have achieved long-term growth. We interviewed 30 senior leaders of such SMEs and found that most leaders espouse key high performance work practices such as selective hiring, employee development, open communication, and, to a varying degree, performance management and employee participation. Through flexible informal practices, SME leaders tap into employee’s intrinsic motivation to enhance performance and to develop personal trust and reciprocity. Overall, our research paints a picture of HRM in growth-oriented UK SMEs as a complex phenomenon where a number of formal and informal HR levers interact, guided by a compelling vision, and creating a positive company culture in the process.

Associated Themes
  • Management and Leadership
  • Productivity and performance
Research Report

Sustaining growth – the HR dimension HR practices and management and leadership skills of High Growth SMEs

Prior business demographics research conducted by the ERC identified that only a small minority of UK SMEs experience sustainable growth over an extended period of time. For instance, of the firms that were newly established in 1998 just 6% showed an appreciable employee growth by 2013. What lies behind such a remarkable performance on the part of so few companies? In this paper, we investigate the leadership behaviours and high performance work practices (i.e. those HR practices that are intended to align employees’ performance with organizational goals through self-regulation rather than sanctions) that are associated with growth.

Author

Koryak, Oksana, Nicolaou, Nicos

Associated Themes
  • Management and Leadership
  • Productivity and performance