ERC’s Jonathan Levie, Strathclyde and Mark Hart, Aston co-author a report on entrepreneurship released by the World Economic Forum.

The report, entitled “Leveraging Entrepreneurial Ambition and Innovation: A Global Perspective on Entrepreneurship, Competitiveness and Development” was produced jointly by a Global Entrepreneurship Monitor team of professors from, Strathclyde University, Aston Business School,  Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile and Babson College, US working with a senior team  from  the Investor Industries group at the World Economic Forum  and Endeavor, the organisation that promotes high-impact entrepreneurship in emerging markets around the world.

The report shows that early-stage entrepreneurial activity is higher in economies that are less competitive and lower in highly competitive economies. Conversely, the proportion of ambitious and innovative entrepreneurs is more frequently high in more competitive economies. In many highly competitive economies with low rates of business starts, entrepreneurial drive manifests itself through more formalized structures – in what the report calls “entrepreneurial employee activity” –, which the report suggests, should caution anyone from jumping to quick conclusions about the quality of entrepreneurial ecosystems based on entrepreneurship rates alone.

Professor Hart, who is a co-director of GEM UK , commented “This is the first time that Global Entrepreneurship Monitor and the World Economic Forum have collaborated on a research report. Coming on top of recent “Missing Entrepreneurs” annual reviews and Policy Briefs from the OECD and the European Commission, which drew heavily on GEM data, this demonstrates the traction that GEM is now getting as a authoritative source of information on entrepreneurship around the world.”

The WEF report can be downloaded at http://www.weforum.org/reports  while the OECD/European Commission reports are available free at http://www.oecd.org/cfe/leed/inclusive-entrepreneurship.htm

 

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