Guus Hendriks

Assistant Professor of International Business

Guus Hendriks is an Assistant Professor of International Business at Warwick Business School. He holds a PhD from Erasmus University Rotterdam (the Netherlands). His research interests relate to the portfolio growth strategies of multinational enterprises, the internationalization of emerging market multinationals as well as the development effects of foreign investment. His work on these topics has won several awards, including the Best Overall Paper Award of Academy of Management’s International Management division and the GSJ Prize for Best Global Strategy Paper. His work is published in journals such as the Journal of Management Studies and UNCTAD’s Transnational Corporations.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Biography

Guus Hendriks is an Assistant Professor of International Business at Warwick Business School. He holds a PhD from Erasmus University Rotterdam (the Netherlands). His research interests relate to the portfolio growth strategies of multinational enterprises, the internationalization of emerging market multinationals as well as the development effects of foreign investment. His work on these topics has won several awards, including the Best Overall Paper Award of Academy of Management’s International Management division and the GSJ Prize for Best Global Strategy Paper. His work is published in journals such as the Journal of Management Studies and UNCTAD’s Transnational Corporations.

SOTA Review

FDI and local productivity . SOTA Review No 31

The debate concerning the impact that attracting inward investment can have on local productivity has raged for some 30 years. The essential reason for this is that is that there was a juxtaposition between “cost per job” estimates regarding the benefits of seeking to attract inward investment through subsidy, and the firm-based academic literature that analysed firm internationalisation in terms of the new technology or knowledge that often accompanies foreign direct investment. Cynically, one may argue that the emphasis that was placed on determining the productivity growth effects of inward investment was an attempt to justify such subsidies, even when cost per job calculations were unfavourable, but both the policy-based and academic literature represents increasingly detailed attempts to determine the nature of the wider economic benefits of attracting inward investment.

Associated Themes
  • Productivity and performance