Halima Jibril

Research Fellow

Halima Jibril joined the ERC in August 2018. Prior to that, she was a Teaching Assistant at the University of Nottingham and a Research Assistant at the University of Leeds. Halima gained her MSc in Economics and Finance and PhD in Economics from the University of Leeds. Halima’s research interests are in innovation diffusion, financialisation and energy economics. Halima is also interested in econometric methods and quasi experimental methods of impact assessment. She is currently working on the ERC project focused on understanding the diffusion of digital and sustainable technologies within supply chains.

Contact Details

Biography

Halima Jibril joined the ERC in August 2018. Prior to that, she was a Teaching Assistant at the University of Nottingham and a Research Assistant at the University of Leeds. Halima gained her MSc in Economics and Finance and PhD in Economics from the University of Leeds.

Halima’s research interests are in innovation diffusion, financialisation and energy economics. Halima is also interested in econometric methods and quasi experimental methods of impact assessment. She is currently working on the ERC project focused on understanding the diffusion of digital and sustainable technologies within supply chains.

 

Research Report

Evaluation of the Cavendish Enterprise ‘Business Boost’ project

Findings of an evaluation of Cavendish Enterprise’s ‘Boosting SME productivity’ project.

Author

ERC,, Roper, Stephen, Drummond, Halima Jibril,Ian, Scott, Doug

Policy Briefing

What drives productivity growth behind the frontier? A mixed-methods investigation into UK SMEs.

International evidence suggests productivity growth is most rapid among ‘frontier’ firms, i.e. those in the top decile of the productivity distribution. Other studies have identified the marked difference in sectoral productivity growth in the UK over the last decade. Here, we consider the drivers of productivity growth in SMEs which are ‘behind the frontier’.

Research Paper

Getting the right recipe: collaboration strategies for radical and incremental innovators in services. Research Paper No 77

Successful innovation requires both effective idea generation and commercialization. Here, we investigate the benefits of alternative collaboration strategies across the idea generation and commercialization stages of the innovation process. Does collaboration generate complementarities between stages of the innovation process? Or, as external collaboration is costly and risky, can having too many partners be detrimental for innovation performance? 

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Please email [email protected] for the full paper.

Policy Briefing

Getting the right recipe: collaboration strategies for radical and incremental innovators in services.

Successful innovation requires both effective idea generation and commercialization. Here, we investigate the benefits of alternative collaboration strategies across the idea generation and commercialization stages of the innovation process. Does collaboration generate complementarities between stages of the innovation process? Or, as external collaboration is costly and risky, can having too many partners be detrimental for innovation performance?