Jun Du

Professor of Economics

Professor Jun Du is Professor of economics at Aston Business School, her research revolves around the evaluation and determinants of firm performance. She has extensive experience in collaborating with researchers nationally and internationally on projects on the measurement of firm productivity, the relationship between performance and R&D and innovation, finance and investment, ownership, political economy, and internationalisation.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]
Telephone:0121 204 3340

Research Themes

  • Business Growth

Biography

Professor Jun Du is Professor of economics at Aston Business School, her research revolves around the evaluation and determinants of firm performance. She has extensive experience in collaborating with researchers nationally and internationally on projects on the measurement of firm productivity, the relationship between performance and R&D and innovation, finance and investment, ownership, political economy, and internationalisation.  She is an expert in advanced econometric methodologies based on various micro-data from both developed and developing countries. Jun has published in many international journals including the Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Law and Economics, Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Research Policy, Journal of Productivity Analysis. She has been the PI, and CI, of several externally funded projects related to firm productivity and growth, including the ESRC First Grant and the most recent NESTA project on linking high growth firms and productivity. Jun is a current grant holder of Leverhulme Fellowship. She is a member of ESRC Peer Review College and associate editor of Regional Studies.

 

Policy Briefing
Research Paper

Fast-growth firms and their wider economic impact: UK evidence.

ERC Research Paper No 73

Research Paper

Fast-growth firms in the UK: definition and policy implications.

ERC Research Paper No 63

Policy Briefing
White Paper