Neha Prashar

Research Fellow

Neha gained her Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics with Economics at University College London and went onto do her Master’s degree in Development Economics at the University of Birmingham.

Contact Details

Biography

Neha gained her Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics with Economics at University College London and went onto do her Master’s degree in Development Economics at the University of Birmingham. After successfully receiving funding for her PhD, she is finishing her PhD in Economics at the University of Birmingham and gained a Research Fellow position at the Enterprise Research Centre.

Past research focuses on the labour market in India, assessing the impact of affirmative action policies in public employment on targeted groups. Her interests lie in the field of labour, gender and development economics.

Insight

Understanding Disparities in Local Productivity in the UK: Are we using the right measure?

The pandemic has brought about difficult times for many businesses in the UK. Currently, with the onset of a second wave, and the end of the Brexit transition period nearing, the road to economic recovery looks arduous. Inevitably, the rate of job and firm destruction will increase but for those businesses that manage to survive, sustainable long-term productivity will be key to recovery and growth. However, are we using the right measure of an average when looking at productivity?

Associated Themes
  • Productivity and performance
Insight

Online Peer-to-Peer lending to finance business growth: Evidence from Funding Circle

Evidence on the business segment of Peer-to-Peer (P2P) lending is still scarce due to the relative novelty of the phenomenon born in 2010. In this paper, we use data from the Funding Circle (FC) loan book over the period 2010-2017 to emphasise the growing importance of this type of alternative finance as a source of funding for growth of small businesses. Loans for growth purposes represent the most significant part of the FC loan portfolio, the largest marketplace platform for business loans in the UK, before working capital loans and asset finance. Therefore, there is evidence that small businesses turn to online platforms to fund their growth.

Associated Themes
  • Finance
Insight

Business Dynamism and COVID-19 – an early assessment

How will Covid-19 affect business dynamism in the UK? Although, this question is yet to be answered, this paper aims to provide an early assessment by comparing company incorporations and dissolutions in the first quarter of 2020 with the same period in 2019 using the latest available data from the FAME dataset. We observe a drop in incorporations and an increase in dissolutions. The analysis shows that there has been a 70% increase in the number of company dissolutions in March 2020 compared to March 2019. In absolute terms, London had the biggest increase with over 6,400 more dissolutions. In relative terms, this sharp increase was particularly striking in the West Midlands and Wales both of which experienced more than a 100% increase in dissolutions. The sectors particularly influenced by this trend are Wholesale & Retail, Professional Services, Transportation & Storage, Information & Communication and Construction. One important point is that the increase in company dissolutions is driven by young firms which appear as the most vulnerable when facing uncertainty and the current unprecedented challenges.
The UK Government has unveiled a substantive package of support for UK firms, but at the time of writing many firms are struggling to access this assistance and there are some obvious gaps in the range of initiatives announced. If those shortcomings are not remedied quickly, it is foreseeable that we will continue to see a long, slow decline in the number of private-sector firms that support millions of jobs across the economy. In that context, rather than seeing a V-shaped downturn and rebound as some economists such as the OBR have predicted, we could instead see an L-shape recession dragged down by a net loss of companies over a long period.

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
  • COVID-19
  • Productivity and performance
Research Report

Covid19: Critique and Proposals to Develop More Comprehensive and Inclusive Support for the SelfEmployed

The UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak has promised the self-employed they are ‘not forgotten’ and claimed that his headline programme – the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) – will protect 95% of those for whom self-employment is a main job. However, the policy excludes start-ups and, in an initial critique, we called for businesses without a 201819 Self-Assessment record (new businesses or those that did not become profitable until after April 6 2019) to have a chance to do their 2019-20 assessment early from April 6th 2020 for one month. This would then make them eligible for an SEISS payment in June 2020.
We also analysed Covid19 support for the self-employed in Germany and Denmark and found more comprehensive packages, supporting business costs and not just selfemployed income.

Following further discussion and analysis, this document outlines in detail the support for income losses and business losses or cash flow problems available to four categories of self-employed worker under UK Covid19 policy: the established self-employed for whom self-employment is a main job; the new(ish) self-employed for whom self-employment is a main job; the self-employed as a second job, and; the established self-employed who grew their businesses so self-employment became their main job in 2019-20. See Tables 1-4 below. We estimate that nearly I in 5 of the self-employed – over 750,000 people - are excluded from the SEISS and that many of the unprotected will have low or no social protection under Universal Credit and the Employment and Support Allowance. This means that some have no pay during periods of Covid19 sickness and self-isolation, a situation that could undermine the social distancing strategy. Home-based businesses without premises have no access to grant support with business losses and, we argue, are likely to be reluctant to apply for the Business Interruption Loan Scheme or, indeed, to be eligible for this fund.


Author

ERC,, MMU,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
  • COVID-19
Research Report

Northern Powerhouse Local Growth Dashboard

The UK Local Growth Dashboard has been developed by the Enterprise Research Centre (ERC) and builds on the LEP Growth Dashboard first launched in June 2014. Its purpose is to present a set of growth metrics for start-ups and existing firms across a range of sub-national geographies in the UK with a specific focus on each of the 38 English Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) areas. Alongside these metrics it provides some other contextual data for each LEP including the changing sectoral composition of local economies over time.
This version of the Local Growth Dashboard was requested by the Greater Manchester Growth Company for the 11 Northern Powerhouse LEPs: Cheshire and Warrington, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Humber, Lancashire, Leeds City Region, Liverpool City Region, North East, Sheffield City Region, Tees Valley and York, North Yorkshire and East Riding.
The Local Growth Dashboard can be used as a source of evidence to inform discussions on priorities in business support concerning small business growth and includes easily understood metrics which can be readily updated on an annual basis.
This report is designed to simply present the data for others to use and it is not the intention here to investigate the reasons for these variations as that can be found elsewhere in the research outputs of the ERC and the wider research and policy literature.

Author

ERC,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
  • Productivity and performance
Research Report

UK Local Growth Dashboard 2019

The UK Local Growth Dashboard has been developed by the Enterprise Research Centre (ERC) and builds on the LEP Growth Dashboard first launched in June 2014. Its purpose is to present a set of growth metrics for start-ups and existing firms across a range of sub-national geographies in the UK with a specific focus on each of the 38 English Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) areas. Alongside these metrics it provides some other contextual data for each LEP including the changing sectoral composition of local economies over time.

The Local Growth Dashboard can be used as a source of evidence to inform discussions on priorities in business support concerning small business growth and includes easily understood metrics which can be readily updated on an annual basis. This report is designed to simply present the data for others to use and it is not the intention here to investigate the reasons for these variations as that can be found elsewhere in the research outputs of the ERC and the wider research and policy literature.

Download the Data file at : http://www.enterpriseresearch.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Local-Growth-Dashboard-2019-Master-Datafile-September-4.xlsx





Author

ERC,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
Research Report

State of Small Business Britain 2019

The State of Small Business Britain report 2019.
The increasing levels of political uncertainty in the UK sets the context for this review of trends in the small business community in mid-2019.
We seek to provide an overview of business confidence and the extent to which that is reflected in the key datasets we have been monitoring for many years. We focus on the following:
• Business Confidence
• Job Creation and Destruction
• Entrepreneurship
• Firm Growth
Alongside this we will highlight some of the key messages coming out of our core research programme, which provide insights into current debates on high-growth, productivity and management practices.

Author

ERC,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
  • Productivity and performance
Insight

Job Creation and Destruction in the UK 1998-2018

Using an established international analytical framework for job creation and destruction we observe that just over a quarter of all jobs in the private sector were either destroyed or created over a typical 12 month period – a remarkable level of turbulence in the UK labour market which provides a more granular analysis of the recent so-called ‘employment miracle’. Despite the rise in employment since the Great Recession there has been a slight fall in the measure of business dynamism which is a cause for concern given its importance to the overall level of productivity in the economy.

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
Research Report

UK Local Growth Dashboard 2018

The UK Local Growth Dashboard has been developed by the Enterprise Research Centre (ERC) and builds on the LEP Growth Dashboard first launched in June 2014. Its purpose is to present a set of growth metrics for start-ups and existing firms across a range of sub-national geographies in the UK with a specific focus on each of the 38 English Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) areas. Alongside these metrics it provides some other contextual data for each LEP including the changing sectoral composition of local economies over time.
2018 Data: http://www.enterpriseresearch.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/2018-dashboard-master.xlsx



Author

ERC,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
Research Report

State of Small Business Britain Report 2018

The report brings together a range of the latest data and insights on the growth and performance of UK SMEs. It sets out key SME trends based on a round-up of the latest research evidence including analysis of the Business Structures Database and the Longitudinal Small Business Survey. It also reports on the key findings from the ERC’s first Micro-business Britain survey, and from the 2018 UK Local Growth Dashboard – an annual publication which presents growth metrics for start-ups and existing firms across a range of sub-national geographies, including LEP areas.
Launched at the ERC’s Annual State of Small Business Britain Conference 2018.

Author

ERC,

Associated Themes
  • Business Growth
  • Management and Leadership
  • Productivity and performance