Areti Gkypali

Research Fellow, ERC

Dr Areti Gkypali joined ERC in March 2016 as a Research Fellow working with Professors Stephen Roper, James Love and Nola Hewitt-Dundas focusing on SMEs, innovation, productivity, exports and business eco-systems. Prior to joining the ERC, Areti worked at the Department of Economics, University of Patras for two years as a Postdoctoral Fellow where she also obtained her PhD in Economics

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Research Themes

  • Innovation and Exporting
  • Leadership

Biography

Dr Areti Gkypali joined ERC in March 2016 as a Research Fellow working with Professors Stephen Roper, James Love and Nola Hewitt-Dundas focusing on SMEs, innovation, productivity, exports and business eco-systems. Prior to joining the ERC, Areti worked at the Department of Economics, University of Patras for two years as a Postdoctoral Fellow where she also obtained her PhD in Economics.

Areti’s main research interests revolve around economics of innovation and international business. She is particularly interested in the investigation of relationships between innovation, efficiency and productivity, and export strategies of SMEs. Her previous research focused on the endogeneity surrounding the internationalization and knowledge creation strategy of SMEs. She has published her work in Industrial and Corporate Change, Economics of Innovation and New Technology and Eurasian Business Review. Her recent work focuses on the interplay between internal and external sources of knowledge creation on innovation and export performance. She has presented her research work in International Conferences including European International Business Academy, R&D Management, and Governance of a Complex World.

Research Paper

Export status and SME productivity: learning-to-export versus learning-by-exporting. Research Paper No 71

Exporting offers firms the opportunity both to maximise profits from their existing products and services and, through ‘learning-by-exporting’, to identify new innovation opportunities. In this paper, we exploit a unique data source to examine the strategic choices of smaller firms in terms of exporting or non-exporting. We pay particular attention to a substantial group of export-capable firms which state that they have products or services suitable for exporting but have no intention to export.

Associated Themes
Research Paper

Home Alone: Innovation and sales growth intentions among the sole self-employed. Research Paper No 59

It is widely known that solo self-employed entrepreneurs enjoy non-pecuniary benefits from their employment status and earn less compared to those employed. They have greater ‘freedom and autonomy’ in running their business and as such they pursue their intrinsic commercial ambitions relying on their experience, abilities and exploiting the available opportunities from their external environment. In this paper we argue that solo self-employed entrepreneurs’ growth ambitions shape their future innovation strategy. We develop a theoretical framework and empirically analyse the relationship and the determinants of innovation and growth intentions using a large sample of UK self-employed entrepreneurs. In doing so we extend the theory of planned behaviour to incorporate the role of entrepreneurs’ past experience in innovation and growth in shaping their corresponding future intentions. Our empirical results suggest that past innovation performance and achieved growth rates shape future entrepreneurial intentions and ambitions through an adaptive learning process given the level of entrepreneurial capabilities and external environment opportunities.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation and Exporting
Research Paper

Accessibility, utility and learning effects in university-business collaboration. Research Paper No 57.

UK government reports have emphasised the potential role of universities in driving localised economic development. There may be a utility-accessibility trade-off, however, between the accessibility of local university knowledge and its ‘fit’ with the specific needs of local firms. Here, using data from UK Innovation Surveys (UKIS) covering the period 2004 to 2012, we examine this trade-off and how it differs for firms of different sizes. Our analysis suggests four main empirical results. First, we find support for the predicted inverted-U shape relationship between the distance between collaborators and the innovation benefits. Second, we find evidence, in accord with the utility/accessibility trade-off, that local university collaboration benefits only small and medium firms. Third, we find that learning effects from previous collaborations with customers, suppliers etc. increase the probability of collaborative activity. Fourth, we find strong evidence of the persistence of university collaborations. Our results re-affirm the evidence from other studies of the value of university collaboration and suggest the value of policy action to address market failures which arise in the formation of university-small business collaborations.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation and Exporting
Research Paper

Does learning from prior collaboration help firms to overcome the “two worlds” paradox in university-business collaboration? Research Paper No 55

There is now substantial evidence on the positive contribution universities can make to helping firms’ innovation. Building university-business collaborations, however, confronts the ‘two-worlds’ paradox, and the difference in institutional logics and priorities between businesses and universities. Here, we consider whether firms’ experience from prior collaboration can generate learning which can help to overcome the two-world’s paradox and improve their ability to generate new-to-the-market innovations in collaboration with universities. Based on panel data for UK companies, we find evidence of significant learning effects in the commercialisation pipeline for new-to-the market innovation. Firms working with, say, customers in one period are significantly more likely to collaborate with universities in subsequent periods. Further down the pipeline, collaborating with universities increases the probability of a firm making new-to-the-market innovations (as opposed to new-to-the-firm innovation) by 21-24 per cent regardless of firm size. The commercial benefits of collaborative, new-to-the-market innovation are concentrated in medium and larger firms with no significant effect for small companies. There is the potential for policy intervention both to increase levels of small business-university collaboration and assist smaller firms to maximise the commercial benefits of collaborative, new-to-the-market innovations.

Associated Themes