Catherine Robinson

Associate Dean

Catherine Robinson is Assoicate Dean at Kent Business School (KBS) and and a Co-Investigator on WISERD Civil Society (www.wiserd.ac.uk). She has more than 20 years’ experience of researching issues related to productivity and firm performance in the UK and internationally and has published widely in both areas.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]  

Biography

Catherine Robinson is Assoicate Dean at Kent Business School (KBS) and and a Co-Investigator on WISERD Civil Society (www.wiserd.ac.uk). She has more than 20 years’ experience of researching issues related to productivity and firm performance in the UK and internationally and has published widely in both areas.

Policy Briefing

The Role of Innovation in Small Business Performance: A Regional Perspective.

The Longitudinal Small Business Survey (LSBS) allows for more consistent SME analyses for the UK than ever before by tracking the same firms over time. Our research looks at the regional context, as well as firm specific variables, that are associated with labour productivity outcomes for SMEs. The paper considers the role of City-Region characteristics, as defined in terms of labour market, business dynamics, R&D spend and City-Region agglomeration on labour productivity, alongside firm-level associations.

The paper addresses a research gap in our understanding of how City-Region characteristics support the SME community in Britain by seeking to tease out the channels through which the benefits might accrue. Improving our knowledge of these channels could potentially enable more effective support provision from a policy perspective.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
  • Productivity and performance
Research Paper

The Role of Innovation in Small Business Performance: A Regional Perspective. Research Paper No 82

The Longitudinal Small Business Survey (LSBS) allows for more consistent SME analyses for the UK than ever before by tracking the same firms over time. Our research looks at the regional context, as well as firm specific variables, that are associated with labour productivity outcomes for SMEs. The paper considers the role of City-Region characteristics, as defined in terms of labour market, business dynamics, R&D spend and City-Region agglomeration on labour productivity, alongside firm-level associations.

The paper addresses a research gap in our understanding of how City-Region characteristics support the SME community in Britain by seeking to tease out the channels through which the benefits might accrue. Improving our knowledge of these channels could potentially enable more effective support provision from a policy perspective.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
  • Productivity and performance
SOTA Review

Are Social Enterprises Different? SOTA Review No 30

Over the past decade, much has been made of the growth in the number of social enterprises – businesses with primarily social or environmental aims – as an organisational form (c.f. Teasdale et al, 2013; Kerlin 2010). This is not limited to the UK nor to Europe. Such growth has been discussed in relation to the aftermath of the global financial crisis, even allowing for politically motivated definitional changes (Teasdale et al, 2013). Calls to ‘do capitalism differently’ have continued since the financial crisis, with recent social activism typified by the Extinction Rebellion movement, indicating that market failure associated with the environment and long-term social problems are neither being dealt with by the market nor political systems that focus on the short-term (Economist, 2019). Social enterprise has been touted as the solution to some aspects of such failure and yet much of the early academic literature debated exactly what determined social enterprise status. Empirical analysis of performance, longevity and success will be at best partial and at worst confused without a clear understanding of which enterprises are social and indeed whether this matters or not. This review summarises the dominant arguments in the social enterprise literature and looks at the direction for future research.

Associated Themes
  • Productivity and performance