Joanne Turner

Research Fellow - innovation Studies

Joanne joined the Enterprise Research Centre (ERC) at the University of Warwick in October 2013. Initially, as a PhD student within the Centre, Joanne examined how a firm’s industry environment – in particular, the appropriability regime – affects its intangibles strategy and innovation performance. In May 2018, Joanne became an ERC Research Fellow working on projects examining the productivity and growth returns to publicly-funded and privately-funded R&D, the links between intellectual property protection and innovation/innovation success, and the role of local, regional and broader eco-system factors in supporting innovation, exporting, growth and productivity.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Research Themes

  • Management and Leadership

Biography

Joanne joined the Enterprise Research Centre (ERC) at the University of Warwick in October 2013. Initially, as a PhD student within the Centre, Joanne examined how a firm’s industry environment – in particular, the appropriability regime – affects its intangibles strategy and innovation performance. In May 2018, Joanne became an ERC Research Fellow working on projects examining the productivity and growth returns to publicly-funded and privately-funded R&D, the links between intellectual property protection and innovation/innovation success, and the role of local, regional and broader eco-system factors in supporting innovation, exporting, growth and productivity.
Prior to embarking on her PhD in 2013, Joanne worked for five years as a Research Associate in the ESRC Macroeconomic Modelling Bureau where she undertook comparative and methodological economic research using large-scale macroeconomic models of the UK and World economies. Joanne also worked for three years in the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick on an ESRC-funded project examining the spread of fast-food outlets in the UK. Alongside these roles, Joanne taught undergraduate macro and micro economic seminars at the University of Warwick and Aston University. Joanne has a BA and an MSocSc in Economics and a PhD in Business and Management.

Insight

The business effects of pandemics – a rapid literature review

This review considers the existing evidence on the business effects of pandemics, with a particular focus on the impact on small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Evidence from previous pandemics is reviewed, and in addition, we provide an overview of early assessments of the emerging evidence on the business impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Chinese firms and other related businesses.

Evidence on the 1918 influenza pandemic in the US suggests higher mortality in urban areas and higher working-age mortality – a very different pattern to COVID-19. Shutdowns did cause significant losses for many businesses, especially those in the service and entertainment industries that suffered double-digit losses in revenue. Other businesses that specialised in health-care products experienced gains in revenue. The 1918 pandemic caused labour shortages in the US as well as longer-term productivity benefits. These were not repeated in other countries. Scenario-based studies for the US and UK have also examined potential pandemic effects and may provide a more robust indication of potential medium-term effects from COVID-19.

Early evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic in China emphasises the severity of the short-term effects on SMEs. In February 2020, 30 per cent reported that, due to a cash shortage, they would be able to sustain their business for no more than three months; 30 percent reported that they would be able to sustain their business for six to twelve months. Furthermore, 30 per cent of firms have seen their income fall by more than 50 per cent, with almost a third reporting a 20 to 50 per cent reduction. Three months after the COVID-19 outbreak in China, many small businesses are not working at full capacity. Many employees continue to work from home, and business owners attempt to fix broken supply chains and look for new domestic and overseas contracts. Estimates suggest that each ten-day period of lost work in the Chinese economy reduces quarterly GDP growth by 0.39 to 0.46 percent.

Associated Themes
  • COVID-19
  • Productivity and performance
Policy Briefing

Pathways to efficiency, pathways to growth: Evidence from the UK Innovation Survey

Previous studies have suggested there is little correlation between efficiency and growth at firm level. Here, using data from successive waves of the UK innovation Survey we consider two questions. First, do different types of innovation have different effects on efficiency and growth? Secondly, does the source of firms’ R&D finance matter?. Is there a difference between the innovation effects of publicly-supported and wholly-privately-funded R&D?

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
  • Productivity and performance
Research Paper

Pathways to efficiency, pathways to growth: Evidence from the UK Innovation Survey. Research Paper No. 83

Previous studies have suggested there is little correlation between efficiency – measured by sales per employee - and growth at firm level. Here, using data from successive waves of the UK innovation survey we consider two questions.
- Do different types of innovation have different effects on efficiency and growth?
- We consider whether the source of firms’ R&D finance matters.
Together our results suggest the importance of aligning innovation investments with broader corporate and policy objectives and the potential value of policy support for process innovation to achieve positive growth and efficiency outcomes.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation
  • Productivity and performance
SOTA Review

Trade marks and registered designs: Evidence on the links to innovation and business performance. SOTA No 19

Applications for trade marks and registered designs have risen sharply in recent years with the application numbers for trade marks in 2017 being more than double what they were in 1995, and the application numbers for registered designs in 2016 reaching their highest point since 1995. In light of this, what does the evidence suggest about the relationship between trade marks/registered designs and innovation output?

Compared to that of patents, the literature examining trade marks and registered designs and the links to innovation is more limited with much of the empirical evidence largely confined to the examination of firms’ private returns. The empirical evidence, in general, suggests a positive relationship between trade marking activity/registered design activity and innovation/firm performance.

Authors
Associated Themes
  • Innovation