Temitope Akinremi

Research Fellow- Productivity in UK Engineering

Temitope Akinremi joined the Enterprise Research Centre (ESRC) at Warwick Business School in February 2018. Prior to that, she earned a PhD in Engineering Management from Coventry University, where she also worked as a Teaching Assistant. She has a BSc and an MSc in Chemical Engineering. Her experience also spans across the oil and gas industry and chemical process industry where she worked as a process engineer, process improvement researcher and business development manager with different companies.

Contact Details

Biography

Temitope Akinremi joined the Enterprise Research Centre (ESRC) at Warwick Business School in February 2018.  Prior to that, she earned a PhD in Engineering Management from Coventry University, where she also worked as a Teaching Assistant.  She has a BSc and an MSc in Chemical Engineering.  Her experience also spans across the oil and gas industry and chemical process industry where she worked as a process engineer, process improvement researcher and business development manager with different companies. Temitope is currently working on an ESCR research Grant funded project, which focuses on SMEs, innovation, productivity and business eco-systems.  More specifically, her work examines key practices that contribute to productivity improvements in the foundry and metal component manufacturing industries.  She is interested in understanding how productivity can be enhanced in these industry sectors as well as the interactions between them. Temitope is particularly interested in: Sustainability integration in business models, managing supply chains to enhance profitability whilst minimizing negative impact on sustainability dimensions, project management, management of engineering processes, industry process improvements and optimization.

 

Research Paper

The Collaboration Paradox: Understanding the Barriers to Small Firms’ Innovation Collaboration. Research Paper No 81

Empirical evidence demonstrates that there is an increasing need for firms to adopt collaborative innovation strategies. We explore three specific informational market failures, which may act as limiting factors to the extent of collaborative innovation among smaller firms. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews, we explore how decision-makers in two traditional UK manufacturing sectors dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) – metal-forming and metal-casting - acquire and evaluate knowledge about the trustworthiness, capabilities and strategic orientation of potential innovation partners. Our findings indicate that improving information availability about potential collaborators could significantly increase engagement in collaborative innovation and help overcome the collaboration paradox. Supply-chain partners and trade bodies emerge as ‘honest brokers’ who could address market failures generating public goods to overcome informational barriers to collaboration.

Associated Themes
  • Innovation