Professor Tomasz Mickiewicz

Head of Economics & Strategy Group, Aston Business School

Professor Tomasz Mickiewicz joined Aston Business School in January 2012. He is now Head of the Economics and Strategy Group at Aston Business School. His previous position was Professor of Comparative Economics at SSEES University College London (since 2008), where he started as a lecturer in 1996. At the ERC he is part of the research team looking at Entrepreneurial Ambition.

Biography

Professor Tomasz Mickiewicz joined Aston Business School in January 2012. He is now Head of the Economics and Strategy Group at Aston Business School. His previous position was Professor of Comparative Economics at SSEES University College London (since 2008), where he started as a lecturer in 1996. At ERC he is part of the research team looking at Entreprenurial Ambition.

His work on comparative entrepreneurship and on high growth aspiration entrepreneurship. He is also involved in research on social entrepreneurship, informal economy, tax avoidance and on the role that social capital (at various levels) plays supporting entrepreneurship. He published extensively on both the new EU member states and potential member states; at present he works on two projects, one related to entrepreneurship in Latvia, and another in post-conflict Bosnia and Herzegovina. He has extensive experience in research projects, including coordinating an EU project and participating in other, EU, ESRC and USAID funded.

Research Paper

Ambitious Entrepreneurship and Migration A Multi-Level Study across the Local Authorities in England and Wales. Research Paper No 47

We consider why both immigrants and regional migrants may embark on different types of entrepreneurial projects: high versus low aspiration; opportunity driven versus necessity driven. Next, using Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, we construct a multiple-years sample of UK working age population with wide spatial coverage, and apply a multi-level multinomial logit model to test and compare propensities of migrants to enter into different forms of entrepreneurship. We find that – compared with those who are not spatially mobile – both internal (regional) migrants and immigrants are more likely to start new ventures characterised by high growth aspirations. Immigrants are more likely than non-migrants to engage in both opportunity-driven and high-aspiration entrepreneurship, but, unlike regional migrants, not in necessity-driven and low-aspiration entry.

Associated Themes