Rhian Eveleigh

Economist at The Intellectual Property Office

Rhian is an economist working in the Economics, Research and Evidence team at The Intellectual Property Office. Her responsibilities involve supporting internal policy development, the analysis of external data and evidence and to carry out and commission research.

Contact Details

Email:[email protected]

Biography

Rhian is an economist working in the Economics, Research and Evidence team at The Intellectual Property Office. Her responsibilities involve supporting internal policy development, the analysis of external data and evidence and to carry out and commission research. She works across all intellectual property policy areas including copyright infringement and enforcement to patents, innovation and growth. Previously she completed a Masters in Economics from The University of Warwick. Her undergraduate degree is in Economics from The University of Exeter.

 

Research Paper

The market for Technology Licensing in the UK. Research Paper No 43.

The social benefit of a patent system lies in its ability to underpin the circulation of technology in the economy through technology licensing and in facilitating the growth of technology markets. This evidence brief considers the main dimensions of the technology licensing market in the UK, drawing on expenditure data from the Community Innovation Survey in order say more about the characteristics of buyers in the market. This is an area which remains relatively under explored and can provide a useful basis upon which to develop effective policy. We estimate the size of the technology licensing market, highlight the temporary nature of licensing expenditure and explore the participation of firms. We find small firms are more frequent purchasers of technology licensing but large firms account for the larger shares of spending. Similarly, R&D services firms are large buyers of technology licenses and dominate spending in the technology licensing. We also find the participation of innovative firms dominates that by non-innovative firms.

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